Garden Bloggers Bloom Day for October

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day for October

As October’s cool temperatures settle in, we find the garden slowly winding down for the season. Most plants have finished blooming, and many begin to die back with the onset of winter. But there is color to be found in the fall landscape, and oh so much more than the chrysanthemums that are found on every doorstep. Brilliant foliage, colorful berries, and even a few perennial flowers take center stage deep into the autumn season. And so, as the skies turn gray, and you feel a hint of snow this October, I hope you find enjoyment in these pictures of our autumn garden.
Remember you can click on each image to see a larger version.
Fall is the time for the Swamp Sunflower (Helianthus angustifolius) And ‘Gold Lace’ is putting on a show as we speak. Towering in the garden to a height of 6-8′ its bright yellow blossoms thrive in the moist soil of our meadow.
Helianthus 'Gold Lace'
Helianthus 'Gold Lace'
Bolton’s Aster (Boltonia asteroides ‘Snowbank’) is still managing to paint the garden with its white asterlike blossoms.
Boltonia 'Snowbank'
Boltonia ‘Snowbank’
Even the shaded areas of the garden offer up a display late in the season, as eveidenced by the Cinnamon Fern (Osmunda cinnomomea). It lacy dark green foliage explodes in the fall, lighting up the dark corners with its golden brown hues. Visible from across the yard, it provides a welcome greeting home.
Osmunda cinnamomea
Osmunda cinnamomea
A plant I’m sure many of you have seen along the woodland and wetland edges, the Winterberry holly begins to make itself known to the caasual viewer. Its bright red berries will hang on the branches well after the foliage drops. That is, until our bird friends clean each branch, leaving only the stem until next spring’s leafout.
Ilex verticillata
Ilex verticillata
Blue Shadow Fothergilla (Fothergilla ‘Blue Shadow’) is a wonderful small shrub in the mixed border. It’ early creamy bottle brush flowers, give way to soft powder blue foliage, that eventually erupts as though it were a Sugar Maple. Reds, yellows and oranges consume the plant in autumn before finally dropping to the ground leaving an attractive branching habit to enjoy all winter. Truely a four season gem!
Fothergilla 'Blue Shadow'
Fothergilla ‘Blue Shadow’
Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia), a native vine, grows wildly in the woods surrounding our yard. This time of year it also turns a deep red, and is visible from many parts of the garden. Look for this beautiful vine climbing a white birch, and you will see Mother Nature at her creative best.
Parthenocissus quinquefolia
Parthenocissus quinquefolia
What would fall in New england be without maples. This Red Maple (Acer rubrum) never fails to impress, and is commented by nearly all who visit.
Acer rubrum
Acer rubrum
May you all find enjoyment in your Autumn Landscapes!
Scott

13 thoughts on “Garden Bloggers Bloom Day for October

    1. Looks like we think alike Christina, and both in on time this month. Fothergilla is underused in our landscapes, and deserves more attention.

      Regards,

      Scott

    1. These Gold Lace are great aren’t they? I love that you look them straight in the eye or even better look up at them!

      Thanks for the kind words.

      Scott

    1. Fall seemed to come quickly, and it feels like it might leave fast also. I hope not! I hope you are enjoying fall down in NC.

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting Helen,

      Scott

    1. Thanks Susan. I agree, I love Winterberry Holly also. It really is a joy watching them seemingly emerge as the leaves drop. What a great season extender.

      Thanks for the comments,

      Scott

  1. Years ago I worked in a garden center. I remember it was fall, and in the distance, among the nursery stock, was a Winterberry Holly. But all I could see was a huge mass of red color. I was pretty far away, and assumed it was one of the trees showing beautiful fall color.

    I went closer to see, and to my amazement, it was a Winterberry Holly absolutely covered in red berries!

    So that’s why it’s one of my favorites…those great red berries. Unfortunately, the deer like it too.

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