Worthy of Words Wednesday 1.1.14 – Formal Gardens at the Vanderbilt!

Worthy of Words Wednesday 1.1.14 – Formal Gardens at the Vanderbilt!

Masonry is an artform. Whether it’s brick and mortar or stonework, it adds wonderful structure to the garden. Take it a step farther and combine it artfully with wood and plants and you have garden magic!!  This past weekend I visited the formal gardens of  F. W. Vanderbilt National Historic Site in Hyde Park, NY. As you can see in the images below, all three elements combine nicely to create an amazing garden! 

Have you structure in your garden? Would you consider adding it? I’d love to hear your thoughts on how these images inspire you!

Enjoy! 

 

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Worthy of Words Wednesday 3.27.13 – Symmetry, Shears, Planning…

Worthy of Words Wednesday 3.27.13 – Symmetry, Shears, Planning…

Every once in a while I take a photo that deserves a little discussion; that makes it a perfect candidate for “Worthy of Words Wednesday”! The following photo is of a landscaped (and I use that term lightly), area in front of a gas station in South Windsor, CT.

I’m not a huge fan of symmetry in landscape design, unless it’s used in a very formal design and the location is apropos.  In this vignette we see how symmetry, combined with the inartistic use of shears, lack of care, and failure to plan for plant growth, have produced an eye sore that obscures the view of the station. No disrespect to the creator of this planting, but we see too many instances like this when a landscape designer should have been consulted. Having this planting properly designed would have saved the property owner years of maintenance fees, the hopefully soon to be incurred renovation fee, and would even have drawn attention to the station.

Which is better kids, attract customers or shield their view?

Symmetry, the use of shears, and the lack of planning, have created an eyesore that obscures the view of this business.
Symmetry, the use of shears, and the lack of planning, have created an eyesore that obscures the view of this business.

 

Worthy of Words Wednesday 10.3.2012 – These ain’t your parents Coreopsis!

Worthy of Words Wednesday 10.3.2012 – These ain’t your parents Coreopsis!

Worthy of Words Wednesday, because sometimes being worth a thousand words isn’t enough!

Plant hybridizing has exploded over the past 10 years, and has brought us a wide variety  of  truly wonderful new cultivars. It has brought a few duds also, and up until a recent trip to Sunny Border Nurseries, I had wondered about some of the new Coreopsis introductions. We have gotten away from using Coreopsis in our projects, bland and ubiquitous yellows from the old tried and true varieties had lost my interest, and brilliant new color introductions proved not to be  hardy enough for our Connecticut gardens. It looks as though Daryl Probst has changed that. Through his “Big Bang” series of Coreosis, he has brought us some wonderfully dazzling color in a long blooming, garden friendly plant, that has survived well in his Massachusetts zone 5 test gardens. The blocks in these pictures below, caught my eye from quite a distance. These are just a few of the newer introductions,  and after seeing them close up, I’m ready to reintroduce my clients to the genus Coreopsis!

Check out the individual flower color in these cultivars, then the effect that massing them would achieve. Click on each of the photos for a great close up look at each! Impressive, no? Tell me what you think, would like to see Coreopsis in your garden?

"Scott Hokunson" "Blue Heron Landscape Design"
Coreopsis x ‘Star Cluster’

 

"Scott Hokunson" "Blue Heron Landscape Design"
Coreopsis x ‘Star Cluster’

 

"Scott Hokunson" "Blue Heron Landscape Design"
Coreopsis x ‘Cosmic Evolutuion’

 

"Scott Hokunson" "Blue Heron Landscape Design"
Coreopsis x ‘Cosmic Evolutuion’

 

"Scott Hokunson" "Blue Heron Landscape Design"
Coreopsis verticillata ‘Route 66’

 

"Scott Hokunson" "Blue Heron Landscape Design"
Coreopsis verticillata ‘Route 66’

 

 

 

 

 

Worthy of Words Wednesday 8.22.12 – Coneheads!

Worthy of Words Wednesday 8.22.12 – Coneheads!

An acceptable pruning technique for White Pine, or a clever disguise for visitors from the planet Remulak? If you notice strange beings “consuming mass quantities”, and shouting Mepps! Mepps!, better alert the authorities!

"Scott Hokunson" "Blue Heron Landscape Design"
White Pine (Pinus strobus) pruned like “Coneheads”…

 

"Scott Hokunson" "Blue Heron Landscape Design"
White Pine (Pinus strobus) pruned like “Coneheads”…

 

"Scott Hokunson" "Blue Heron Landscape Design"
White Pine (Pinus strobus) pruned like “Coneheads”…

 

"Scott Hokunson" "Blue Heron Landscape Design"
White Pine (Pinus strobus) pruned like “Coneheads”…

 

Notice any similarities?

 

 

 

 

Worthy of Words Wednesday 7.4.12 – Culver’s Root!

Worthy of Words Wednesday 7.4.12 – Culver’s Root!

The blossoms of this Culver’s Root (Veronicastrum virginicum) almost resemble the brilliant trails of fireworks, making it an excellent choice for an Independence Day post! As these blossoms open, they will be swarmed by butterflies and other pollinators and later in the season birds will visit to feast on the seed. A tall perennial (4-6′), Culver’s Root also adds a little interest through the frosty months, and provides a safe place for beneficial insects to overwinter. A Wonderful addition to the middle or back of the perennial border, and a great plant for the habitat garden!

"Scott Hokunson" "Blue Heron Landscape Design"
Culver’s Root (Veronicastrum virginicum)