Garden Designers Roundtable – Transitions…

Garden Designers Roundtable – Transitions…

How strange that the nature of life is change, yet the nature of human beings is to resist change. And how ironic that the difficult times we fear might ruin us are the very ones that can break us open and help us blossom into who we were meant to be.

~ Elizabeth Lesser  Broken Open: How Difficult Times Can Help Us Grow

I find it inspiring how often life quotes mirror those of the garden. The cycle of life is never so apparent as in a garden, and perhaps that is why as humans, we see in the garden, a reflection of our failures and triumphs, our most brilliant blossoms and our deepest roots.

For garden Designers Roundtable this month, we are discussing “Transitions”. Merriam-Webster defines transition as; passage from one state, stage, subject, or place to another, or a movement, development, or evolution from one form, stage, or style to another. Once again the metaphor for life that is the garden is clear.

Gardens like life, are rife with transition. The designer has many different elements between which he must draw the visitor. With a keen eye and a little imagination, a simple change of space becomes a journey, and time may pass with elegant grace.

Let’s take a look at some examples of these “Transitions”, in the form of journeys, boundaries and time.

In journey ~

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A woodland path takes its time to lead us around points of interest.

Move between elevations can be done simply, or in grand style.

The depth of this view of the garden seems to tell us there will be interest along the way!

In boundary ~

A fence section both frames and divides this planting, seemingly holding the Miscanthus at bay.

This boundary wall is a wonderfully rural transition between the wild of the wood and the civility of the lawn.

A median is not only boundary between directions of traffic, but a welcoming transition into the world of retail.

In time ~

As the blossom of this Little Lime hydrangea transtions from lime-green to white to pink, we mark the seasons in the garden.

A Hosta leaf also marks the passage of time.

A favorite of mine, the beautiful straw foliage of this Hameln Dwarf Fountain Grass will stand all winter until the new growth of next season begins to sprout completing its cycle of transition.

And…

As the morning fog burns off the valley floor, revealing the Heublein Tower, life transitions from it's sleepy start into the vibrant bustle of the day.

How do you mark transition in your garden? I love to hear about it, please leave a comment!

And please stop by and visit with my fellow Rountable bloggers today as they give their impressions of “Transition”.

Jocelyn Chilvers : The Art Garden : Denver, CO

Deborah Silver : Dirt Simple : Detroit, MI

Scott Hokunson : Blue Heron Landscapes : Granby, CT

Mary Gallagher Gray : Black Walnut Dispatch : Washington, D.C.

Debbie Roberts : A Garden of Possibilities : Stamford, CT

David Cristiani : The Desert Edge : Albuquerque, NM